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In computing most technologies have lots of terms and acronyms to learn, it's par for the course, you get used to it. However in computer security the frustration is multiplied as there are often many different terms that mean the same thing. It makes implementing security hard, because understanding it is hard, and I'm not surprised why security is considered badly implemented because the average Joe will struggle (and for the record I'm the average Chris so I struggle too ;-). I've been trying recently to get straight in my head what is stored in the WLS identity and trust keystores, and what the difference between identity and trust is anyhow. Thanks to kind assistance from Gerard Davison, I think I can now post my understandings, and as usual, hopefully the post is helpful to other readers. As noted however security to me is a difficult area, and so be sure to c... (more)

Five Lessons The League Can Teach Us about Cyber Security

Lessons from the hit show, The League The 2013 NFL season kicks off tonight with the defending Super Bowl champion Baltimore Ravens visiting the Denver Broncos. For many of us, the start of football season means lazy chicken wing and pizza-filled Sundays in front of the TV. But, it also means it’s time to scramble together and pick your fantasy football team. If you participate in fantasy football, you may be a fan of the hit FX television show, The League which premiered last night. Don’t worry – there are no spoilers here. The League follows a group of old friends in a fantasy football league that seems to bleed into every aspect of their lives. Even if you don’t like fantasy football, or football for that matter, this show is likely to have you either laughing or turning away from the television in disgust at their attempts to make each other’s lives miserable. A... (more)

Comodo Code Signing Certificate Supports Mozilla Standards

Comodo code-signing certificates enable developers to sign Mozilla extensions or "Add-ons" for a wide variety of different operating systems such as Microsoft Windows, Mac OS X and Linux. Mozilla applications recognize XPIs as "trusted" when they are signed with a Comodo Code-Signing certificate. XPI (pronounced "Zippy") is short for "Cross Platform Install." XPI enables Developers to create installer modules for their programs meant to enhance Mozilla applications such as Firefox, Thunderbird, Sea Monkey and Sunbird. Comodo Code-Signing certificates verify and authenticate the entity that has created the XPI file, allowing end users to trust their execution. Most browsers will not accept action commands from downloaded code unless the code is signed by a trusted Certificate Authority. An example of a trusted code-signing certificate, this one has been issued by Como... (more)

What Makes Cloud Storage Different from Traditional SAN and NAS?

Many in the IT industry seem to enjoy arguing exactly what does and does not constitute a cloud service. As I mentioned in my post on the controversy over private cloud services, I do not feel that these arguments are productive. We should focus on results and business value instead of arguing about semantics. However, the current crop of cloud storage solutions have many important differences from traditional SAN and NAS storage, something that seems to surprise many end users I meet. Cloud storage capacity is not your fathers blocks and files! Primary, Secondary, and Tiered Storage Most IT infrastructures contain a wide variety of storage devices, but these have traditionally been divided into two categories: Primary or production storage serves active applications and is accessed randomly. The primary category includes most familiar direct-attached disks (DAS), s... (more)

Lori MacVittie Interview at Cloud Connect

I got a chance to sit down with another member of the Technical Marketing Team at F5, Lori MacVittie at the Cloud Connect conference in Santa Clara this week.  We chat about Web 2.0, Infrastructure 2.0, dynamic networks, cloud interoperability standards, what 3.0 looks like and a few other things.  Thanks Lori! ... (more)

How to Secure vCloud Director and the vCloud API

This year’s VMworld conference saw the announcement of VMware’s new vCloud Director product, a culmination of the vision for the cloud computing the company articulated last year and a significant step forward in providing a true enterprise-grade cloud. This is virtualization 2.0—a major rethink about how IT should deliver infrastructure services. VMware believes that the secure hybrid cloud is the future of enterprise IT, and given their success of late it is hard to argue against them. vCloud Director (vCD) is interesting because it avoids the classic virtualization metaphors rooted in the physical world—hosts, SANs, and networks—and instead promotes a resource-centric view contained with the virtual datacenter (VDC). vCD pools resources into logical groupings that carry an associated cost. This ability to monetize is important not just in public clouds, but for ... (more)

Windows Azure Overview Part 4: Security

This blog post is part of the series on Windows Azure. You can read the rest of this series here (Part 1 ; Part 2 ; Part 3). There are very few organizations that apply as many security measures as Microsoft does for its Windows Azure service. Listed below are some of the precautions Microsoft has implemented for Windows Azure to secure your applications and data: Secret Locations of Datacenters For almost every organization, the datacenter is somewhere inside it. It’s not that hard for an intruder to find out the exact location. Microsoft keeps the information on the wherabouts of their datacenters strictly confidential. Secure Perimeter In case someone finds out the location of a datacenter and tries to get in, they’ll face an extremely secured perimeter with fences, video surveillance, guards, and motion detectors. All these precautions make it extremely difficul... (more)

Top Five Lessons Learned from Mobilizing SAP in the Cloud

Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE I am excited to present this article from mobility expert Srini Subramanian.  He is the CTO at Unvired and shares his experiences implementing mobility in the cloud in SAP environments with us. Working with SAP customers on the cloud has been a rich learning and myth busting experience in many ways. Contrary to popular belief, a number of SAP customers do have a strong affinity for deploying solutions via the cloud. So what are the insights from our first set of cloud customers? Cloud is relevant and top of the mind for SAP customers Many of them already use other solutions such as Salesforce, Workday, Successfactors, etc. and integrate these SAAS / cloud solutions to their SAP systems in a number of ways. A cloud based delivery of the mobile platform struck a chord with many of the CIO/CTO and IT heads that we spoke to. It is ... (more)

Review of HTTP 2.0 – The Ever-Changing Web We Live In

Review of HTTP 2.0 – The Ever-Changing Web We Live In By: Aaron Croyle You may have heard recently that Facebook will be implementing SPDY. In that light I’d like to give you a basic understanding of the upcoming improvements to HTTP (HyperText Transfer Protocol). As you probably know, this is the protocol that moves most of the HTML documents and images around the web. Here’s a few definitions to get you up to speed: HTTP/2.0 This is the new version of HTTP currently in development by the httpbis working group of the IETF. The last update was HTTP 1.1 as described in RFC 2616 in 1999. TLS Transport Layer Security is an upgrade to SSL v3.0 (Secure Sockets Layer). It operates at the transport layer to encrypt application-specific protocols such as HTTP, FTP, SMTP, etc. TLS NPN Next Protocol Negotiation is an extension to TLS which allows the application layer to neg... (more)

How to Stop Running the Project Gauntlet of Doom with DevOps

I could cite various studies, pundits, and research to prove that automation improves the overall success rates of continuous deployment efforts, mitigates outages caused by human error and misconfiguration, and generally makes the data center smell minty fresh, but we already know all of that. It's generally understood that there is a general need for devops, for continuous deployment and lifecycle management systems enabled by frameworks like Puppet. What we don't often consider is that the process of "puppetizing" production (and pre-production) environments affords organizations the opportunity to re-evaluate existing network and application architecture and eliminate inefficiencies that exist there, as well. Many an architecture has been built upon legacy application network infrastructure, for example, that cannot be – easily or otherwise – puppetized and thu... (more)

VXL announces new, enterprise-level, Fusion™ device manager supporting both Windows and Linux users

Manchester, UK - VXL's enterprise-level Fusion™ device manger goes from strength to strength with the launch of a new version supporting Linux users. Complementing the current Windows XP Embedded Standard, WES 7 and WE8S supported offering, Fusion now sets the industry benchmark for the management of thin clients. Powerful, user-friendly and highly scalable, Fusion™ device manager is designed to configure, monitor and manage all VXL thin client devices as well as conventional PCs and POS terminals*. Using an easy to use, web based, GUI, Fusion™ device manager can quickly and easily issue software images, patches, updates and add-ons, thereby enhancing user productivity and reducing support costs. Frank Noon VP Worldwide Sales commented; "Fusion's ability to manage multiple operating systems combined with its true enterprise-level credentials make it the perfect ma... (more)